Politics
Friday 08 january, 2010, 00:32
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President’s office ex-official blows Yushchenko-Yanukovych secret deal

As earlier reported by ZIK, deputy head of the department for domestic political issues and regional development at the presidential administration Yaroslav Kozachok, D.Sc. and Professor, resigned saying he could not continue to work for Viktor Yushchenko due to the latter’s cynicism and immorality. Kozachok publicized an agreement signed by Yanukovych and Yushchenko on pre-election and post-election cooperation. Kozachok explained his motives to the Western Information Agency in an exclusive interview Jan. 3.

“I have worked for the president’s office for about 4 years, after I quitted my academic career. In this decision I was driven by the desire to apply all my knowledge and skills to build a Ukrainian state and implement the democratic ideals of the 2004 revolution.

As Ukraine’s destiny is at stake now, I cannot accept the cynicism and immorality of politicians, seeing how our president’s declarations are at odds with his actual deeds.

Specifically, as a civil servant, I cannot accept the ruinous policy pursued by the president in his attempts to discredit the cabinet.

The president is deliberately blocking the cabinet’s decisions, playing branches of power off against each other, vetoing crucial legislation, notably, changes to the budget that would bolster up local governments, the anti money-laundering law, the laws to increase spending on healthcare etc.

On the other hand, the president has backed the laws proposed by the opposition aimed at destabilizing Ukraine’s financial system, for instance, the law on higher salaries and pensions. All this is proof that Yushchenko puts toppling his major opponent [Yulia Tymoshenko] above the interests of Ukraine.

Another example of Yushchenko’s anti-constitutional activities is his manipulation of the Central bank, including uncontrolled multi-billion sums given to bail-out commercial banks, shady deals to play with the hryvnia exchange rates, and, finally, exerting pressure on the Central bank to cut funding for the whole country at the end of 2009.
Yushchenko’s attempts to destabilize the situation in Ukraine and his tooth-and-nail fight with his political rival have turned Yushchenko into Ukraine’s bitter enemy.

Against this backdrop, I would like to comment here on the relationship between Yushchenko and Yanukovych.

The relationship was formed late 2005 and continued, on-and-off, till present.

A new stage of their rapprochement which began in September 2009 has turned into a close cooperation.

Such Regions heavyweights as Mykola Azarov, Oleksandr Lavrynovych, Serhy Liovochkin are frequent visitors at the president’s office while personal meetings between Yushchenko and Yanukovych are regular.

The last straw that made me resign from Yushchenko’s office was the confidential “Agreement on Political Reconciliation and the Development of Ukraine” between Yushchenko and Yanukovych which details common strategy for the elections and afterwards.

Under the disguise of restoring the divide between Ukraine’s eastern and western regions, the authors of the agreement have engaged in political corruption by safeguarding their positions in power after the presidential election. Thus, in paragraph 2 of the Agreement they “undertake a commitment not to criticize each other in the course of the campaign and use all possible means to support Viktor Yanukovych in the runoff election.”

The parties of the Agreement will ensure the nomination of Viktor Yushchenko for premier and a positive approval vote by Verkhovna Rada, the agreement runs.

In my view, Viktor Yushchenko is more interested in the agreement than Viktor Yanukovych.

Both politicians have agreed on the line-up of the executive after the 2010 election.

Yanukovych, if elected, will not dismiss SBU head Valentyn Nalyvajchenko, NSDC head Rayisa Bohatyryova. He will nominate Arseny Yatseniuk for foreign minister, Anatoly Shapoval for Central bank governor. Yushchenko will also keep his oblast governors in Kyiv (Vira Ulyanchenko), Ivano-Frankivsk (Mykola Palijchuk), Ternopil (Yury Chyzmar), Poltava (Valery Asadchev) and Kherson (Borys Sylenkov) – in line with paragraph 5 of the Agreement.

The Agreement ensures posts in the cabinet to Yushchenko’s insiders Ivan Vasiunyk, Ihor Tarasiuk, Yury Pavlenko and Yury Melnyk.

As a person who believes in democratic values, I could not accept what was going on in the president’s office. That is why I resigned. It was a tough decision to make, but there are things that are above one’s personal interests and safety.”

Comments 8
  • Willy from Odessa 11 January 2010 16:13
    More lies and false attribution from Yuri who is actually is from Odessa.
    Babba has published the same comment elsewhere also. Nice try at misdirection.
    Reply
  • Count Yorga 11 January 2010 16:10
    Bogdan, and who is this Bohdan Kozachok? Nobody ever heard of him until he comes up with this mythical "agreement" which has been denied by both sides, Yush and Yanu. Let's look at both possibilities. Either it's true , or it's not.
    a) It's true- So what's the big deal with having an agreement with Yanu? After all he has the support of 1/3 of the country. Yulka had an agreement with him to illegally usurp total power and rule the country-collectively for the next 10-15 years, after swearing on stacks of bibles she could NEVER work with the PR. Why has everybody forgotten about this attempt at a palace coup? Politics do make for strange bedfellows. If you recall. Yush already had an agreement with Yanu a couple years ago and if the trurh be told, it was Yanu and the PR that supported Yekhanurov during his whole time as PM. Yulka and BYT were the defacto opposition-after Yush fired her from the PM's job for being totally incompetent. The country somehow survived. Even though it won't happen, I join the many, many people in UA who would prefer a Yanu-Pres, Yush- PM. Yats-Speaker scenario over Yulka as Pres. She just scares the hell out of me and millions of others.
    b) It's not true. This could very well be another of the countless attempts at mud slinging Ukie Politics is so famous for. There is so much crap being thrown around by all sides, it's impossible to separate truth from fiction.
    Reply
  • Bogdan 11 January 2010 16:09
    Now that Yaroslav Kozachok has revealed that he has lost faith in Yushchenko because he feels that Yushch has abandoned all of his moral scruples by making an alliance with Yanuk, it seems that Yushch is ready to sell his soul to keep Yulia out of power and himself in no matter what the cost to Ukraine or the Ukrainian people. Until now I have always thought that there was at core real moral decency in Yushch, but it seems that all that was just an illusion. So sad, he could have been a good president and even a good politician in opposition if he had kept his moral scrupples, asuming of course that Kozachok is honest in what he says.
    Reply
  • Yuri-Kharkiv 10 January 2010 03:57
    Anthony Van Der Craats, you know very well that Babba wouldn't write what you wrote. Why don't you mature some and stop playing childish games, wanker, and show your somewhat of a grown male.
    Reply
  • Babba 9 January 2010 10:17
    Taras Kuzio has a good arctile published by the James Foundation. in whch he also address this issue.
    of Course the "Lord of the flies" gang of Pro-Yushchenko supporters associated with Thomas Martinez are in denial and seeking to trash KP and Kuzio
    Reply
  • democracy not autocracy 8 January 2010 17:27
    Elmer any proposal to reinstate presidential authority is a backward step.

    Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

    Of course they would have to say they believe in a strong president. They are only a week away from the election.
    Hopefully there will be sufficient numbers on the parliament that will put Ukraine first and the president second.
    Given time the focus of the debate will swing back towards a parliamentary system after the presidential election is over.
    Ukraine needs to decide does it want to be a part of Europe or not. If the answer is yes the it should adopt a European Parliamentary system of governance.

    25 out of 27 EU states are parliamentary democracies.

    If Ukraine reverts back to an autocratic system of Presidential authority then it might as well kiss good by to the notion of joining the EU anytime soon.
    Reply
  • Anyone but Yushcheno 8 January 2010 17:17
    If this deal is true, and all indications are that it has substance, then Ukraine would be better off supporting Tymoshenko.

    Looks like the ship is sinking and the rats are looking for a safe haven.

    Its one thing to form a coalition with Party of regions but another to form an alliance with Yushchenko.

    Yushchenko has been the main cause for instability and division in Ukraine. Party of regions should recall Yushvhenko's efforts to dismiss Yanukovych's government.
    Padrty of regions and Yanukovych doe not need to now sell their soul to the devil. They already hold poll position. They do not need to cut any deal with Yushchenko or his associates, they are set to lose anyway. Yanukovych would loose respect and support if such a deal was fullfilled.
    Reply
  • elmer 8 January 2010 16:29
    This is what happens when oblast governors, and assorted bank and other governors are appointed without elections or without some sort of public oversight - back room deals.
    Yushchenko, like Kuchma, seeks a "soft landing" - at any cost. Yanukovych seeks power - at any cost.
    They are simply sovoks, who have learned to mouth words about democracy, but in reality they both seek political machines for their own personal comfort and wealth.
    Yanukovych, in typical Ukrainian ass backwards thinking, is now trying to peddle the idea of a "strong president" - just like Tihipko. And, now, just like Tymoshenko.
    They all want to be the "strong man" - just like Kuchma.
    That is NOT democracy - that is a mafia. That is Kuchmism. That is a collection of political machines seeking to preserve their power and wealth, and nation be damned.
    In other words, Ukraine still has a HUGE sovok hangover. All that's happened is that all of these sovoks have poured a little sweet syrup ("we love democracy, life is better for everyone) to cover up their sovok nature.
    "think one thing, say another, do a third."
    Sovoks - YUK!!!
    Reply
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